The Creative Appeal of Fanon

There are three things I am a very huge fan of: one is Doctor Who (and other fiction related to it), another is The Waltons (and other fiction related to it) and the third is Donkey Kong (and other fiction related to it). These are just three things I really, really love and I find a lot of new things to enjoy by following through chains of crossovers which stem from those three. To be honest, that encompasses basically everything and I am quite pleased when there is overlap between these things.
    Anyway, I really get into the fanon for all of these big three things. For those who don’t know, fanon is fan explanations, or theories, for things in a series, based on evidence in the text. I like to make connections between two parts of the same franchise which were never really planned to be connected, to think of ways that apparent contradictions can actually be reconciled. It’s especially fun, I find, to take small pieces of media, things which were never really intended to have any significance (and which won’t have had much thought put into their creation) and take them wholly seriously and come up with ways that they impact the later pieces. Some people may ask “Why?” but the simple answer is that it’s fun!
    The longer answer is that it’s also a worthwhile creative exercise. When writing, small connections between things often prove to make interesting plot points, and making these connections in the works that others have created is good practice. I think it’s probably the kind of thing that more creative people are inclined to do, while less creative fans may be confused by the appeal of such actions. But, yes, basically I think fanon is good, and if it’s an activity you take part in; have fun!

(Don’t miss today’s Finger Puppet Show!)

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